Monday, 25 June 2012

Balance exercise for persons with multiple sclerosis using Wii games: a randomised, controlled multi-centre study.

Ylva E NilsagÄrd, Anette S Forsber and Lena von Koch
Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 2012 June 6

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Background: The use of interactive video games is expanding within rehabilitation. The evidence base is, however, limited.
Objective: Our aim was to evaluate the effects of a Nintendo Wii Fit® balance exercise programme on balance function and walking ability in people with multiple sclerosis (MS).
Methods: A multi-centre, randomised, controlled single-blinded trial with random allocation to exercise or no exercise. The exercise group participated in a programme of 12 supervised 30-min sessions of balance exercises using Wii games, twice a week for 6–7 weeks. Primary outcome was the Timed Up and Go test (TUG). In total, 84 participants were enrolled; four were lost to follow-up.
Results: After the intervention, there were no statistically significant differences between groups but effect sizes for the TUG, TUGcognitive and, the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) were moderate and small for all other measures. Statistically significant improvements within the exercise group were present for all measures (large to moderate effect sizes) except in walking speed and balance confidence. The non-exercise group showed statistically significant improvements for the Four Square Step Test and the DGI.
Conclusion: In comparison with no intervention, a programme of supervised balance exercise using Nintendo Wii Fit® did not render statistically significant differences, but presented moderate effect sizes for several measures of balance performance.

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Sunday, 17 June 2012

Impact of an Active Video Game on Healthy Children's Physical Activity

Tom Baranowski, Dina Abdelsamad, Janice Baranowski, Teresia Margareta O'Connor, Debbe Thompson, Anthony Barnett, Ester Cerin and Tzu-An Chen
Originally published online February 27, 2012;

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OBJECTIVE: This naturalistic study tests whether children receiving a new (to them) active video game spontaneously engage in more physical activity than those receiving an inactive video game, and whether
the effect would be greater among children in unsafe neighbourhoods, who might not be allowed to play outside.

METHODS: Participants were children 9 to 12 years of age, with a BMI .50th percentile, but ,99th percentile; none of these children a medical condition that would preclude physical activity or playing video
games. A randomized clinical trial assigned children to receiving 2 active or 2 inactive video games, the peripherals necessary to run the games, and a Wii console. Physical activity was monitored by using accelerometers for 5 weeks over the course of a 13-week experiment. Neighbourhood safety was assessed with a 12 item validated questionnaire.

RESULTS: There was no evidence that children receiving the active video games were more active in general, or at any time, than children receiving the inactive video games. The outcomes were not moderated
by parent perceived neighborhood safety, child BMI z score, or other demographic characteristics.

CONCLUSIONS: These results provide no reason to believe that simply acquiring an active video game under naturalistic circumstances provides a public health benefit to children.

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Wednesday, 6 June 2012

Comparison between Nintendo Wii Fit and conventional rehabilitation on functional performance outcomes after hamstring anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

Gul Baltaci, Gulcan Harput, Bunyamin Haksever, Burak Ulusoy andHamza Ozer

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The aim of this prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial was to compare the outcomes, including knee strength, balance, coordination, proprioception and response time, of Nintendo Wii Fit with those of conventional rehabilitation on the subjects with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.
Methods Thirty volunteer subjects were enrolled in either Wii Fit (n = 15; mean age, 29 ± 7 years) or conventional rehabilitation (n = 15; mean age, 29 ± 6 years) programmes from the first week up to 12th weeks of the operation. Endoscopic reconstruction of a completely ruptured ACL was performed by using graft harvested from hamstrings. Each subject underwent an individual therapeutic programme. Functional examinations included the measurements of the balance using modified star excursion balance test, coordination, proprioception and response time using functional squat system and strength of flexor and extensor muscles of the involved and uninvolved leg using an isokinetic machine.
Results There was no significant difference between Wii Fit and conventional group in terms of isokinetic knee strength at 12th week, and dynamic balance, and functional squat tests including coordination, proprioception and response time at first, 8th and 12th weeks of the rehabilitation.
Conclusion Two different 12-week-physiotherapy programmes following ACL reconstruction have the same affect on muscle strength, dynamic balance and functional performance values in both groups. We considered that the practice of Wii Fit activities like conventional rehabilitation could also address physical therapy goals, which included improving visual–perceptual processing, coordination, proprioception and functional mobility.

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