Wednesday, 19 September 2012

Energy expended playing Xbox Kinect™ and Wii™ games: a preliminary study comparing single and multiplayer modes.

Physiotherapy. 2012 Sep;98(3):224-9. Epub 2012 Jul 25.

O'Donovan C, Hirsch E, Holohan E, McBride I, McManus R, Hussey J.

Discipline of Physiotherapy, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.

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OBJECTIVES: It has been reported that a higher galvanic skin response is seen when playing video games against another human player than when playing alone, which suggests increased effort. The objectives of this study were to compare energy expenditure when playing two popular active video game consoles, and to compare energy expenditure when playing in single and multiplayer modes.
DESIGN: Crossover trial with randomised playing order.
PARTICIPANTS: Fourteen healthy adults with a mean age of 21 [standard deviation (SD) 3] years.
METHODS AND INTERVENTIONS: Energy expenditure was measured using an indirect calorimeter at rest, during 10minutes of play on Xbox Kinect™ Reflex Ridge in both single and multiplayer modes, and during 10minutes of play on Wii™ Sports Boxing in both single and multiplayer modes.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Metabolic equivalents (METs), heart rate, oxygen consumption and kilocalories expended.
RESULTS: The energy expenditure during all gaming conditions was of a light intensity. Playing on the Xbox Kinect elicited greater energy expenditure than playing on the Wii [mean difference=0.9 METs, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.2 to 1.5]. Playing games in multiplayer mode led to greater energy expenditure (mean difference=0.5 METs, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.9) and heart rate (mean difference=7.9 beats/minute, 95% CI 2.0 to 13.8) than playing in single player mode.
CONCLUSIONS: No gaming condition required moderate-intensity activity in this group of young healthy adults. Potential explanations for the difference in energy expenditure seen between consoles and modes are discussed.

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Copyright © 2012 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 

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